Monthly Archives: March 2016

HCT Debates: Nadir Lahiji

Hans_Holbein_Younger_German_Renaissance

Organised and hosted by Marina Lathouri

Series: HCT Debates: Dis-locutions, the architectural and the political
Date: 18/3/2016
Time: 14:00:00
Venue: New Soft Room

HCT Debates: Dis-locutions, the architectural and the political

The HCT Debates provide a venue for exchange of ideas and arguments. External speakers are invited every week to present and engage with tutors and students. The aim is to position the multiple voices making possible a process of thinking in common, by definition a pedagogical practice different from the seminar or the lecture. The sessions are open to the public.

 

Nadir Lahiji: Architecture, Philosophy, and the Subject of the Baroque

The return of the Baroque in contemporary theory is apparent in the way various academic disciplines are attempting to re-engage with it at a philosophical level. Contemporary architecture, in particular, is notable for an almost obsessive concern with the Baroque and for importing many related concepts from French philosophy into its discourse. Unfortunately, however, to the price of such borrowings has been a massive simplification and reduction of the radical critical core of this remarkable body of work. In this seminar, I examine architecture’s misadventures with the Baroque and submit them to a rigorous critique.

Readings:

Christine Buci-Glucksmann, The Madness of Vision, On Baroque Aesthetics, trans., Dorothy Z. Baker (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2013)

Gilles Deleuze’s, The Fold: Leibniz and the Baroque, Chapter 3.

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PhD / MA HCT Programme: Sven-Olov Wallenstein

Cover Site Journal published by S.O. Wallenstein / 33.2013

Cover ‘Site’ Journal published by S.O. Wallenstein / 33.2013

PhD / MA HCT Programme
Date: 14/3/2016
Time: 18:00:00
Venue: New Soft Room (Organised and hosted by Marina Lathouri)

 

Sven-Olov Wallenstein: Architecture and the Possibility of Critical Theory

The talk explores the possibility of developing a critical theory of architecture that takes into account the critique of dialectics that has been a commonplace in recent philosophy. The ideas of mimesis, negativity, and contradiction, as they were once formulated by Adorno need to be revisited in the light of current developments, both theoretical and practical, and yet, I will propose, they have bearings on the present, precisely because they hold on to the idea of subjectivity and experience as a form of resistance, at a moment when these concepts are being refashioned in terms of the projective and the instrumental.

 

Sven-Olov Wallenstein is Professor of Philosophy at Södertörn University, Stockholm, and editor-in-chief of Site. He is the translator of works by Baumgarten, Winckelmann, Lessing, Kant, Hegel, Frege, Husserl, Heidegger, Levinas, Derrida, Deleuze, Foucault, Rancière and Agamben, as well as the author of numerous books on philosophy, contemporary art, and architecture. Recent publications include Biopolitics and the Emergence of Modern Architecture (2009), Swedish Modernism: Architecture, Consumption and the Welfare State (ed. with Helena Mattsson, 2010), Nihilism, Art, Technology (2011), Translating Hegel: The Phenomenology of Spirit and Modern Philosophy (ed. with Brian Manning Delaney, 2012), Foucault, Biopolitics, and Governmentality (ed. with Jakob Nilsson, 2013), and Madness, Religion, and the Limits of Reason (ed. with Jonna Bornemark) Forthcoming in 2016: Architecture, Critique, Ideology: Essays on Architecture and Theory.

 

 

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HCT Debates: Nina Power

The_collective_political_subject

 

 

Organised and hosted by Marina Lathouri

Series: HCT Debates: Dis-locutions, the architectural and the political
Date: 11/3/2016
Time: 14:00:00
Venue: New Soft Room

HCT Debates: Dis-locutions, the architectural and the political

The HCT Debates provide a venue for exchange of ideas and arguments. External speakers are invited every week to present and engage with tutors and students. The aim is to position the multiple voices making possible a process of thinking in common, by definition a pedagogical practice different from the seminar or the lecture. The sessions are open to the public.

 

Nina Power: The Collective Political Subject: Some Contemporary Ideas

This seminar will look at various recent attempts to conceptualise mass or group subjects in the wake of the supposed disappearance of the working class. It will look at the ideas of Hardt & Negri, Badiou and others, and the concept of work in particular as the site for thinking about what collectives might emerge today.

Nina Power teaches Philosophy at the University of Roehampton and Critical Writing in Art & Design at the Royal College of Art.

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HCT Debates: Jorella Andrews

Robert Smithson, installation view, Cayuga Salt Mine Project exhibited at Cornell University, 1969

Robert Smithson, installation view, Cayuga Salt Mine Project
exhibited at Cornell University, 1969

Organised and hosted by Marina Lathouri, John Palmesino and Douglas Spencer

Series: HCT Debates: Dis-locutions, the architectural and the political
Date: 04/3/2016
Time: 11:00:00
Venue: New Soft Room

HCT Debates: Dis-locutions, the architectural and the political

The HCT Debates provide a venue for exchange of ideas and arguments. External speakers are invited every week to present and engage with tutors and students. The aim is to position the multiple voices making possible a process of thinking in common, by definition a pedagogical practice different from the seminar or the lecture. The sessions are open to the public.

 

Jorella Andrews: Where is called Thinking?

In this seminar – the title of which plays with Heidegger’s classic 1951/52 lecture ‘What is Called Thinking?’ – we will consider practices of thinking, and hence learning, from an inter-corporeal perspective. More specifically, we will think about material structures and infrastructures, and specific situated material performances, that may be seen variously to gather or provoke or redirect thought, thus reconfiguring more conventional ideas we might have as to its nature, location and trajectories.

Our case-studies – which will hopefully also enable us to ask broad questions about how our own contemporary institutional contexts and processes of learning could be reimagined and remade – will include portions of Heidegger’s above-named text: his discussions of the withdrawal of that which must be thought, for instance, and of thought as ‘recollection’. We will also consider insights drawn from Gary Shapiro’s chapter ‘Uncanny Materiality’ (Earthwards: Robert Smithson and Art after Babel, 1995) in which he reflects on the methods and implications of Robert Smithson’s material thought and the questions he raises about the location of art. Visual case studies will range from Smithson’s Cayuga Salt Mine Project, exhibited at Cornell University, 1969, to documentation of students and faculty constructing the Studies Building, Black Mountain College in Fall 1940 to, further back in time, the intricacies and agencies of Saint Jerome’s desk in Antonello da Messina 1475 painting Saint Jerome in His Study (National Gallery, London).

Readings:

  • Extracts from: Martin Heidegger, What is Called Thinking? Perennial, 1976 (PDF attached).
  • Gary Shapiro, “Uncanny Materiality: Decentering Art and Vision” in Earthwards: Robert Smithson and Art after Babel, Berkeley, Los Angeles, London, University of California Press, 1995, pp. 59 -112, plus notes 245-250.

 

Writing Project:

  • 100 words of writing in response to the “Where is Called Thinking” theme drawn from personal experience and, if you like, also drawing on some aspect of the reading.

 

Jorella Andrews is a senior lecturer in the department of Visual Cultures, Goldsmiths, University of London. Her academic work focuses on the relations between philosophical inquiry, the image-world, and art practice, with a particular emphasis on phenomenology (notably the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty). She is also engaged with current debates in the area of material culture. Relevant publications include the essay ‘Critical Materialities’ (2006) and the books Visual Cultures as Objects and Affects (2013) with Simon O’Sullivan and Showing Off! A Philosophy of Image (2014).

 

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